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Science in the news

Science in the news

Media coverage highlights

Business Wire -

Oregon State University to Offer Data Analytics Skills Training Program by Teaming with Fullstack Academy

Fullstack Academy, a national tech education provider, announced today it will bring its data analytics bootcamp program to the West Coast through a collaboration with Oregon State University. Launching in Winter 2022, the bootcamps will train professionals of any tech skill level in just 26 weeks for jobs in the rapidly growing data analytics sector, where skilled talent is in high demand.
IFLScience -

Mushroom Growing Out Of An Ancient Ant's Butthole Is New Fungal Species

Mycology is a fascinating branch of science, delving into the secret lives of fungi, whose beauty is often underrated and little celebrated. A mushroom found preserved in a 50-million-year-old piece of amber certainly demonstrates their beauty – that is, if you ignore the fact it’s growing out of an ant’s rectum.
Live Science -

Peculiar parasitic fungi discovered growing out of the rectum of a 50 million-year-old fossilized ant

Scientists have identified a new species of extinct parasitic fungus bursting from the backside of a 50 million-year-old ant, all perfectly preserved in amber.
Digital Journal -

For the fossil record: Oldest ever fungus discovered

Scientists at Oregon State University have identified what has been described as the oldest known specimen of a fungus. The fungus was discovered parasitizing an ant in fossilized form. Intriguingly, the fossil represents a new fungal genus and species.
SciTechDaily -

Mushroom Growing Out of 50-Million-Year-Old Fossilized Ant Reveals New Species of Fungal Parasite

Oregon State University research has identified the oldest known specimen of a fungus parasitizing an ant, and the fossil also represents a new fungal genus and species.
KGW8 -

Latest sampling shows COVID-19 at levels similar to this time last year

Over the last year, Oregon State University students teamed up with health care workers with the TRACE-COVID-19 project, led by epidemiologist Ben Dalziel, to go-to-door to randomly selected homes in Corvallis offering free COVID-19 testing. They found results similar to what was detected at this time last year.
KGW -

OSU COVID tracing programming expands to vaccinations

In addition to COVID testing, volunteers at Oregon State University also offer antibody tests and vaccinations. Keely Chalmers has an update on the program.
CNET -

Ant trapped in ancient amber with parasitic mushroom stuck in its butt

The amber came from the Baltic region of Europe and contains a carpenter ant. Oregon State University's George Poinar Jr., an international expert in using plant and animal life forms, said the discovery is "the oldest known specimen of a fungus parasitizing an ant, and the fossil also represents a new fungal genus and species."
KLCC -

Latest Corvallis TRACE Effort Finds COVID Prevalence At Early Pandemic Levels

During Oregon State University’s seventh round of COVID-19 sampling throughout Corvallis, TRACE volunteers found evidence of the virus at similar levels seen at the start of the pandemic.
News-Times -

BioBlitz: a citizen science effort

The Oregon Marine Reserves, the PRIMED Network and the Oregon Coast Aquarium are hosting and promoting this summer’s BioBlitz, a citizen science effort to record all living species at a specific time and place, using a smartphone app. Sarah Gravem, a research associate at Oregon State University, is part of the PRIMED team of scientists.
Eat This, Not That! -

This Major Ingredient in Beer May Help Treat Liver Disease, Says New Study

According to new research from Oregon State University, a pair of compounds that originate from hops—the plant that gives beer its flavor and color—can help prevent hepatic steatosis. Also known as fatty liver disease, it occurs when there's a dangerous buildup of fat in the liver.
Sci-News -

Ancient Fungal Parasite of Ants Found Preserved in Baltic Amber

In a paper published this month in the journal Fungal Biology, a duo of paleontologists from the United States and France described a new genus and species of ancient parasitic fungus found in a piece of 50-million-year-old amber from Europe’s Baltic region.
KTVZ -

OSU leading $17M effort to understand universe through low-frequency gravitational waves

Oregon State University is the lead institution for a $17 million National Science Foundation center devoted to pushing the boundaries of physics knowledge by studying the universe through low-frequency gravitational waves. Funded by the NSF as a Physics Frontiers Center, the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves research group at OSU operates under the direction of Xavier Siemens, professor of physics in the OSU College of Science.
Texas Tech Today -

Astrophysicist Receives Share of Five-Year, $17 Million Grant

Oregon State University is the lead institution for a $17 million National Science Foundation center devoted to pushing the boundaries of physics knowledge by studying the universe through low-frequency gravitational waves. Funded by the NSF as a Physics Frontiers Center, the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves, or NANOGrav, research group at OSU operates under the direction of Xavier Siemens, professor of physics in the OSU College of Science.
U of T News -

Pioneering climate change researcher Warren Washington receives honorary degree

An atmospheric scientist for more than 50 years, Oregon State alumn Warren Washington was among the first to harness the power of computers to track climate change. For his excellence as an internationally recognized pioneer of innovative climate change research and methodology, Washington received a Doctor of Science, honoris causa, from the University of Toronto. Washington earned his bachelor’s degree in physics and a master’s degree in meteorology at Oregon State.
Freethink -

Beer Hops Could Hold Key to Preventing Common Liver Disease

Compounds derived from the beer-making staple, hops, slowed the buildup of fat in the livers of mice, suggesting they might be able to help prevent — or even treat — fatty liver disease.
Chemistry World -

Scientists uncover pitfalls of computerised structure determination after finding ‘suspicious disorder’ in explosive crystal

Chemists warn not to blindly trust x-ray crystallography software after finding and correcting mistakes in iodine azide structures. Letting computers take the lead in crystal structure determinations could be generating more inaccurate structures than previously thought.
Science Daily -

New survey method proves Rhode Island's rarest frog may not be so rare

The rarest frog in Rhode Island may not be as rare as scientists once thought after a study by University of Rhode Island researchers using a seldom-used methodology turned up many more of the endangered animals than they expected.
NPR -

OSU Says New Grant From NOAA Will Allow It To Expand Marine Research

A new federal grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration totaling $37 million will allow OSU to expand its marine research program. The program will be led by Associate Professor Francis Chan.
Associated Press -

Hybrid beachgrass could mean trouble for Northwest coast

Scientists at Oregon State University, led by biologist Sally Hacker, have confirmed that two widespread, invasive beachgrasses are now genetically mixing, which could present additional challenges to communities and Pacific Northwest dune restoration.

Media contacts

Journalists are encouraged to contact OSU's Department of News and Research Communications at 541-737-0787 for assistance. Media personnel seeking expert sources for their stories can contact OSU news editor Sean Nealon at 541-737-0787 or sean.nealon@oregonstate.edu.

For more specific content, science news writer Steve Lundeberg is also available at 541-737-4039, or steve.lundeberg@oregonstate.edu.

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Collectively, we plumb a vast breadth of research topics, from aging to zooplankton, from supernovae to superbugs. We pursue scientific research wherever our curiosity leads.