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Saki Nakai sitting outside in a forest.
Students

Mathematics graduate to research cross-cultural psychology for Fulbright

Pre-med Honors student Saki Nakai double majored in psychology and mathematics, completing a French minor abroad. Next year, a Fulbright award will support her research in Luxembourg. 

DNA strands.
Faculty and Staff

Research grants to seed the next great idea

Seed funding from the College of Science Research and Innovation Seed (SciRIS) program continues to bolster ambitious and expansive research projects across biomedical science, fluid dynamics, quantum mechanics and more. 

Artwork, a piece of glass with screen printing of a DNA sequence inside of it.
Microbiology

Microbiologist Jerri Bartholomew elevates microbes to fine art

Bartholomew’s glasswork that fuses artistry with research is on exhibition in The Little Gallery in Kidder Hall from March 7 to April 8, 2022. A new fellowship invites scientist-artists to explore interdisciplinary projects. 

Ph.D. student and researcher Christine Tataru
Graduate students

Martin-O’Neill fellow Christine Tataru uses computers to decode our guts

Christine Tataru receives the 2021-22 Larry W. Martin & Joyce B. O’Neill Endowed Fellowship for her work in computational modeling that seeks to understand how gut microbiomes impact their human hosts’ health. She develops tools and frameworks to advance microbiome research, then uses these tools to explore gut-brain axis phenomenon.

Bryan Lynn sitting outside
Graduate students

Creativity, research and activism intersect for Martin-O’Neill fellow

Integrative Biology Ph.D. candidate Bryan K. Lynn studies evolutionary game theory, advocates for LGBTQ+ equity, and excels at pastry creation. His work uses mathematical modeling to investigate the evolution of cooperation, using bacteria as his subjects. 

Landscape graphic of a sea at night next to a mountain range at sunrise with paths leading towards a hue blue sky.
News

How our scientists are working for a sustainable future

With expertise spanning marine ecology, biofuel development, new modes of energy capture, evolutionary genetics and the microbiomes of coral reefs, OSU is committed to research that puts the environment first.

Chris Beaudry working in a lab with a student
Faculty and Staff

Grants to boost advances in mental health and cancer research

The College of Science awarded two interdisciplinary teams funding to pursue promising leads in mental health and cancer research. One team will investigate the role of the gut-brain axis on sex differences in anxiety, and another will explore ways to develop an synthetic version of HHT-- a rare plant alkaloid that is showing great promise in the development of new medicines for multiple forms of cancer.

Dee Denver standing in front of grass and brick wall.
Integrative Biology

Unexpected harmonies: Templeton award energizes Denver’s exploration of science and Buddhist connections

Evolutionary biologist Dee Denver explores the impact on advancing scientific knowledge by continuously applying fresh perspectives.

Marilyn Mackiewicz standing in front of a grey backdrop.
Faculty and Staff

New chemistry hire uses tiny pieces of gold to solve biomedical problems, promotes innovative mentoring

Mackiewicz is a new assistant professor in the chemistry department and was recruited earlier this year. Formerly at Portland State, her interdisciplinary research uses nanotechnology to solve problems related to human health and the environment.  

Corals along seafloor in Lizard Island.
Research

Scientists awarded grant to investigate how microbiomes can help species withstand climate change

A pivotal National Science Foundation award will enable Oregon State scientists to investigate how microbes influence their wildlife host’s sensitivity and resilience to disruptive changes in the natural environment.

Managing an epidemic with a groundbreaking public health project
Biomedical Science

Managing an epidemic with a groundbreaking public health project

Scientists at Oregon State University acted swiftly to the greatest public health emergency of our time, leveraging the College of Science’s unique capabilities in biomedical research and the quantitative sciences to investigate and contain the coronavirus crisis.