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Dee Denver sitting with crossed legs outside on the Oregon State campus.
Faculty and Staff

Pursuing ‘Dharma in DNA’: Oxford-published author explores the connections between science and Buddhism

  Buddhism and biology — for evolutionary biologist and Department of Integrative Biology Head Dee Denver, the two share more than meets the eye.  

Ben Dalziel
Research

Preparing for the next pandemic: $1M grant to create interdisciplinary research center

A team of Oregon State University researchers, including two College of Science faculty members, have received a $1 million grant from the National Science Foundation to identify, model, predict, track and mitigate the effects of future pandemics.

Dungeness crab in trap. Photo by Pat Kight, Oregon Sea Grant.
OSU Press Releases

Ecologist Francis Chan to lead $4.2M project studying stressors facing Dungeness crab, other marine life under climate change

The researchers will focus on two key species: Dungeness crab, which plays a significant economic and cultural role in Indigenous and other coastal communities and is considered the most valuable single-species fishery in Oregon; and krill, which are tiny crustaceans that play a critical role in the ocean’s food web and serve as a bellwether for ocean health.

Diseased ochre sea star
OSU Press Releases

Proactive responses are most effective for fighting marine disease, Oregon State research shows

The best time to deal with diseases in marine species is before an outbreak occurs, a study by Oregon State University shows.

Headshot of Adam Chouinard in front of a tree.
Faculty and Staff

Training the next generation of faculty in inclusive teaching practices

Adam Chouinard, a senior instructor in the Department of Integrative Biology, has received a $2.88 million grant from the National Science Foundation for a group project aimed at shifting the landscape of biology education on a national scale through graduate teaching professional development.

An aerial image of campus showing buildings and trees.
Faculty and Staff

Meet the eight new faculty members bringing their expertise to OSU

The College of Science is excited to welcome eight new faculty members this fall. They bring diverse expertise in gravitational wave astronomy, applied topology, organometallic compounds, age-dependent diseases and more.

The Valley Library is seen with fall leaves on the ground and students walking across campus.
News

Science receives seven awards at University Day for research, teaching excellence, mentorship and diversity advocacy

College of Science faculty, staff and graduate students received awards for innovative teaching, diversity advocacy, mentorship and more at University Day, Oregon State University’s prestigious annual awards. 

Virginia Weis
News

Virginia Weis named acting associate dean for research and graduate studies

The College of Science is proud to announce University Distinguished Professor of Integrative Biology Virginia Weis as the acting associate dean for research and graduate studies, effective August 5. Weis brings extensive research experience, a history of leadership within the College, and expertise and success in mentoring graduate students.

Molly Burke
News

Evolutionary biologist wins National Institutes of Health award

Molly Burke, assistant professor in the Department of Integrative Biology, has received the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Maximizing Investigators’ Research Award (MIRA) — a unique grant that will support multiple projects focused on aging and infertility.

Image of algal bloom
Research

Grants to address climate change impacts and biomedical challenges

Researchers in the College of Science know that curiosity is boundless. Answers are not stopping points but instead opportunities for deeper questions and discoveries. Continuing to ask questions culminated in three faculty groups receiving College of Science Research and Innovation Seed (SciRIS) awards in July.

Vials sit under blue light.
News

Harm from blue light exposure increases with age, integrative biology research suggests

The damaging effects of daily, lifelong exposure to the blue light emanating from phones, computers and household fixtures worsen as a person ages, new integrative biology research suggests.