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100-million-year-old weevil
Integrative Biology

Ancient, newly identified 'mammoth weevil' used huge 'trunk' to fight for mates

Oregon State University research has identified a 100-million-year-old weevil unlike any other known fossilized or living weevil.

Quagga mussels on rock on bank of Colorado River.
Integrative Biology

Low-flow research on Colorado River sheds light on eventual new normal for Grand Canyon

Researchers from Oregon State University say ecological data gathered during a recent low-flow experiment in the Grand Canyon is a key step toward understanding Colorado River ecosystems as the amount of water in the river continues to decline.

Eastern Spadefoot Toad sitting in leaves.
Integrative Biology

Oregon State Ph.D. candidate sheds light on better way to study reputedly secretive toad

Research by an Integrative Biology Ph.D. candidate Anne Devan-Song in Oregon State University’s College of Science has upended the conventional wisdom that for a century has incorrectly guided the study of the eastern spadefoot toad, which is considered endangered in part of its range.

Bryan Lynn sitting outside
Graduate students

Creativity, research and activism intersect for Martin-O’Neill fellow

Integrative Biology Ph.D. candidate Bryan K. Lynn studies evolutionary game theory, advocates for LGBTQ+ equity, and excels at pastry creation. His work uses mathematical modeling to investigate the evolution of cooperation, using bacteria as his subjects. 

Mushroom growing out of a carpenter ant.
Integrative Biology

Mushroom growing out of fossilized ant reveals new genus and species of fungal parasite

Oregon State University entomologist George Poinar Jr., has identified the oldest known specimen of a fungus parasitizing an ant, and the fossil also represents a new fungal genus and species.

Francis Chan analyzing field samples with students on Oregon coast.
Marine Science

Oregon State selected to lead NOAA institute for marine research with Francis Chan as director

Oregon State University has been selected to host a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration institute focused on collaborative study of the rapidly changing ocean and expanded demands on its use.

TRACE field staff door-to-door sampling in Corvallis neighborhood.
Biomedical Science

Corvallis TRACE-COVID-19 sampling June 5 and 6 to include saliva testing for antibodies

Oregon State University will conduct its seventh round of TRACE-COVID-19 door-to-door sampling throughout Corvallis the weekend of June 5 and 6 for the coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

OSU Graduation cap
Students

The Class of 2021 succeeds against all odds

The College of Science will graduate 670 undergraduate students with baccalaureate degrees in 2020-21, including 68 Honors graduates.

Oregon State zoology senior
Students

Zoology senior merges cultural identity and scientific curiosity

A graduating senior in zoology at Oregon State University, Devonte Casey has been deeply inspired by the synergy between his academic pursuits and his identity as a Native American.

Simone Burton facing away from the camera, holding her scuba fins and wearing her decorated grad cap that says "Honorary Mermaid".
Students

A dream that won't be squelched: Protecting marine life and inspiring the next generation

Simone Burton, an Honors biology major with an option in marine biology, has pushed through more obstacles than she could have imagined only four years ago. Now, she is confident that she will find a powerful way to protect marine life through a career in conservation, science communication and outreach.

Oregon State marine ecologist Jane Lubchenco examines corals in the ocean
Faculty and Staff

Meet Biden's trailblazing climate science adviser

Biden tapped the celebrated Oregon State marine biologist Jane Lubchenco as one of his top advisers. Lubchenco is deputy director for climate and environment at the Office of Science and Technology Policy.

Beachgrass on a dune with a beach below and the ocean beyond
News

Oregon State University research shows two invasive beachgrasses are hybridizing

Two species of sand-stabilizing beachgrasses introduced to the Pacific Northwest starting in the early 1900s are hybridizing, raising new questions about impacts to the coastal ecosystems the non-native plants have been engineering for more than a century.