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Graduate Program in Microbiology

Studying the smallest organisms to tackle the world's biggest problems.

Graduate Program in Microbiology

Studying the smallest organisms to tackle the world's biggest problems.

Microbiology student scuba diving for samples

Graduate students in microbiology receive high-quality academic training to support broad interests in microbiology, including environmental, genomics, immunology, and pathogenic microbiology, that encompass a spectrum of approaches from the ecological and organismal to the molecular, genetic and biochemical. Our vibrant microbiology graduate program has 35 graduate students pursuing master’s and Ph.D. degrees and 30 microbiology and allied faculty who conduct research on subjects such as viruses, bacteria and parasites, and their roles in the health of the environment and humans, animals and plants.

Microbiology graduate students have opportunities to pursue highly interdisciplinary research with faculty across colleges and departments from Molecular and Cellular Biology, Fisheries & Wildlife, Agricultural Sciences, Pharmacy and Oceanography. Students have access to outstanding laboratory and computational infrastructure within the department and at OSU’s Center for Genome Research and Biocomputing.

Microbiology graduate students are supported by research and teaching assistantships. Several students are have also been awarded the highly competitive National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship to support their studies as well as fellowships in the department and at OSU.

Courtney Rae Armour in front of white backdrop
“I chose Oregon State for its impressive computing infrastructure and support for computational research, as well as its Center for Genome Research And Biocomputing where I have found excellent training, facilities and support for students learning to code and conduct computational research.”
Courtney Rae Armour (Ph.D. student in microbiology). Armour relies on computational modeling to study the gut microbiome in the lab of microbiologist Thomas Sharpton.

Meet our students and alumni

Inaugural science fellowship supports research in the Sharpton Microbiome Lab

The College of Science congratulates Courtney Rae Armour, the first graduate student to receive the Larry W. Martin & Joyce B. O’Neill Endowed Fellowship.

Graduate students, alumni win national fellowships for outstanding research

The College of Science congratulates two PhD students for receiving prestigious National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program (NSF GRF) awards for 2018.

Researchers identify type of parasitic bacteria that saps corals of energy

Microbiologists Rebecca Vega Thurber and Grace Klinges have proposed a new genus of bacteria that flourishes when coral reefs become polluted, making them more susceptible to disease.

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